U.S. in the World - Talking Global Issues with Americans: A Practical Guide
Home Feedback
About the Guide Start Using the Guide Keeping Current Community Resources
Start Using the Guide
Sources Consulted


Below are sources for specific facts and figures cited in this Guide. These resources—in addition to those in “Keeping Current” section—may help you or your audience learn more about the facts and stories presented in this guide, and serve as a resource for finding more such data. 


TAB 1: GETTING STARTED (“WHERE THE PUBLIC IS COMING FROM”)



TAB 3: AMERICA'S ROLE IN THE WORLD



TAB 4: INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION



TAB 5: TERRORISM, SPREAD OF DEADLY WEAPONS, USE OF FORCE [L1]

  • For more about terrorists' global networks, and the global efforts to shut them down, see the Council on Foreign Relations' “Terrorism: Questions and Answers”:

    www.cfr.org


  • On the shortage of Arabic linguists in the intelligence community, see press coverage such as “Potomac Watch,” the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 27, 2003.


  • For more on the successes of the Cooperative Threat Reduction program with Russia and other states, see the archives of Arms Control Todayhttp://www.armscontrol.org/subject/tr/


  • To learn about the Chemical Weapons Convention and its results, see the website of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, www.opcw.org

    or the Arms Control Today archives:  http://www.armscontrol.org/subject/cw/



TAB 6: POVERTY, DEVELOPMENT, NATION BUILDING, TRADE

  • Success stories in fighting poverty and promoting open, transparent, functional government are products of the Center for Global Development's “What Works?” working group.  www.cgdev.org/globalhealth


  • For a summary of what has been achieved in fighting poverty, see UN Secretary General Kofi Annan's 2000 Report to the Millennium Assembly.


  • Links between health and economic growth:  Gallup and Sachs, July 2000, The Economic Burden of Malaria, CID Working Paper No. 52, Harvard University.


  • Links between education, health and economic growth and more success stories:  www.BasicEd.org


  • To learn more about debt relief:  www.jubileechannel.org and
    http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/topics/topics_debt/topics_debt_index.cfm


  • Funding to fight poverty:  who gives what:  http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/43/56/2507734.pdf


  • To learn more about African countries policing themselves to improve economic policy and fight corruption, look at the work of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD):  www.nepad.org


  • For a thoughtful and realistic study of American successes and failures in nation-building, see this RAND Corporation study: http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1753/


  • To learn more about the international trade in illicit narcotics, and the crisis-prone countries which are the principal sources of cocaine and heroin, see the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime:  www.unodc.org


  • Estimates of what has caused US job losses over the last decade:  The Economic Policy Institute puts the trade-related figure at 34 percent for 2000-2003 and 58 percent for 1998-2003 (EPI Briefing Paper 149); the Progressive Policy Institute puts it at 30 percent for 2001-2004 (“Job Killer,” by Robert Atkinson, Blueprint Magazine, November 20, 2003.)


  • For a view on the possibilities and the inequities of global trade policy:  http://www.maketradefair.org/en/index.php?file=03042002121618.htm&cat=2&subcat=6&select=1



TAB 7: ENERGY, GLOBAL WARMING

  • On US oil dependence, its foreign policy consequences, energy's role in poor-country economies, and alternatives, see John Podesta and C. Boyd Grey,  “The Future of Energy Policy” in Foreign Affairs, July/August 2003.


  • Energy efficiency successes in Toronto:  http://www.city.toronto.on.ca/energy/


  • On US energy use, and how alternative energy investments could spark job creation and economic growth, see www.apolloalliance.org


  • On energy choices and global warming, and how energy choices relate to global poverty, see:  www.energyfuturecoalition.org



PUBLIC OPINION AND COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH


Some of the original research reports consulted for the guide are available via the links below: